Lawrence Tech hosts Quantified-Self workshop

Release Date: June 26, 2015
Quantified Self (QS)

Dan Johnson, an entrepreneur with Exodynamics in Ann Arbor, shares some of his entrepreneurial experiences with faculty and LTU students during a Quantified-Self workshop.

 

LTU Assistant Professors Mansoor Nasir and Eric Meyer of the biomedical engineering program in LTU’s College of Engineering hosted a workshop in April for faculty members from Lawrence Tech, Kettering University and Ohio Northern University to kick off the Quantified-Self (QS) Roadshow series. The 13 faculty members represented to many different departments, including engineering, life sciences, and computer science.

The Quantified Self (QS) is a movement to use data from an individual’s daily life in order to facilitate methods for improving performance or treatment. The QS ecosystem includes interest from many emergent areas such as big data, miniaturized devices and wearable sensor technology.

The workshop was supported by the Kern Entrepreneurial Engineering Network (KEEN) topical network grant of which Nasir is the primary investigator (PI). Meyer was the PI of the original KEEN topical grant that focused on using Quantified-Self approaches in the classroom to foster the entrepreneurial mindset.

The PIs are using the network grant to disseminate classroom approaches through roadshow events at various universities within the KEEN network. This roadshow program is designed to leverage and disseminate classroom resources for entrepreneurial-mindset learning (EML) and student engagement around the Quantified-Self theme. At the workshop, faculty involved in the original KEEN topical grant on QS shared materials and exchanged ideas on how to develop more modules through collaboration with other interested faculty.

LTU is taking the lead among universities in building this faculty network and is sharing resources at a dedicated website, qs4eml.ltu.edu.

The half-day mini-workshop also included a presentation by Daniel Johnson, who is commercializing a powered exoskeleton for the lumbar spine through a local startup venture, Exodynamics of Ann Arbor. Students from various departments and workshop faculty attended the presentation where Johnson shared his experiences about entrepreneurship and the commercialization of a new technology.

 

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