engineering senior projects 2008 - civil

Civil Engineering Senior Projects 2008


Brandon Township Proposed Parks and Recreation Facilities 
Capital Improvements
2008 Concrete Canoe
Lawrence Tech Housing Complex
LEED Certified Apartment Complex
2008 Steel Bridge
Swartout Estates
Village of Milford Central Station

 




Brandon Township Proposed Parks and Recreation Facilities

The team, Senior Design Associates, designed a parks and recreation facilities development for the Charter Township of Brandon, a continuously expanding community located in northern Oakland County that identified the need for recreation facilities for its residents. The goal of this project was to provide the community with safe, cost-effective, sustainable, and high-quality facilities. These facilities include baseball fields, multi-use athletic fields, pedestrian and bike trails throughout the site, as well an office building with indoor learning facilities. As a sustainable development, some of the green components of the project include using porous pavement, wetland preservation, and providing wastewater treatment in an effort to use gray water for irrigation of the athletic fields. Each student on the team was responsible for a single design component of the engineering solution. These components included construction, transportation, environmental, and water resources engineering.

Members: Kyle Breining, Kelly Jankowski, Robert Randazzo, Brian Zwayer
Faculty Advisor: Donald Carpenter

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Capital Improvements

Associated with the Hines Drive and Middlebelt Crossing

The goal of this project was to help alleviate the roadway flooding on Hines Drive in Westland. Since Hines Drive was constructed in a 100-year floodplain, it is victim to flooding upwards of 35 times per year, causing the roadway to close. This becomes an inconvenience to commuters and frequent users of Hines Park. The location of highest flooding concern on Hines Drive is the area immediately east and west of Middlebelt Road. The members of this project team combined transportation engineering, river engineering, structural engineering, and water resources engineering to design improvements that will reduce roadway flooding to two times or less per year.

Members: Vincent Genco, Phil Mlinarich, James Rowley, Steve Sulzman
Faculty Advisor: Donald Carpenter

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2008 Concrete Canoe

The concrete canoe is part of a competition sponsored by the American Society of Civil Engineers and BASF Admixtures, Inc. Each year, the Committee of National Concrete Canoe Competitions sets forth rules and regulations that govern canoe dimensions, acceptable materials, and judging criteria. This year’s entry from Lawrence Tech is The Dream Cruise, named after the popular local car event that takes place on Woodward Avenue. The canoe is 19 feet long, 30 inches wide, and 12.5 inches deep. Its stand is constructed to resemble a car and the tabletop display brings back the drive-in movie atmosphere. The competition is judged on four categories: the technical report, the final product (which consists of the finished canoe, a three-foot cutaway representative section of the canoe, and the display table), an oral presentation, and the races. The Dream Cruise expands on the successful features of past designs when it comes to employing new materials and construction techniques. The concrete mix design uses polycarboxylate admixtures that have never been used in Lawrence Tech’s concrete canoe history. The reinforcement is Strux 90/40, a new synthetic macro fiber on the market that has a longer length than most fibers used in concrete, thus improving the tensile strength of the canoe. The hull has a completely new design that features a smooth hull, a soft chine, a shallow arc, and a shallow vee. These characteristics allow for an increase in speed without compromising the stability of the canoe. The form was made using a double tabletop that eased the construction and de-molding process by allowing the upper tabletop to be flipped over.

Members: Gregg Bagby, Tierra Logan, Stan Richard, Chase Whitlatch
Faculty Advisors: Hiroshan Hettiarachchi, Elin Jensen

 

Sponsors:
American Society of Civil Engineers, Southeastern Michigan Branch
Aristeo Construction
BASF Admixtures, Inc.
Dimensional Embroidery
Daniel G. Fredenhall
GBM Recycled Concrete, LLC
Grace Construction Products
Huesker
Lafarge
NTH
Nycon
Ohm
Ruby & Associates
Schleede Hampton
Associates Consulting
Engineers
SME
St Marys Cement

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Lawrence Tech Housing Complex

The team’s company, Sustainable Engineering, Inc., designed a sustainable housing complex for the Lawrence Technological University campus located at 21000 West Ten Mile Road in Southfield. The proposed structure will be located northwest of the existing University Housing-North complex. This project is based on the increase of residents living on campus and the need for the expansion of university housing. The sustainable design is cost efficient and environmentally friendly and includes a green roof, bio-retention cells, rain garden, solar panels, tree restoration, and recycled materials.

Members: Jessica Berry, Jeremy Miller, Chintan Shah, Corietta Wentum
Faculty Advisor: Hiroshan Hettiarachchi

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LEED Certified Apartment Complex

The team formed the company, JJAM Engineering, to develop a three-story LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certified apartment complex. The site is located in Clinton Township on the corner of Hall Road and Romeo Plank Road. The team has developed a 30-unit steel structure that features geothermal wells used to reduce the amount of energy needed to heat and cool the building. A green roof is being designed to help reduce water runoff. The runoff that is produced from the development will be stored in bio-retention basins, which will decrease the discharge into the surrounding environment. The building will have an elevator and two stairwells and each of the upper level units will have a balcony.

In order to obtain LEED certification, the design must meet the requirements that are placed by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). The design can earn points based on different criteria, and the topics generally involve energy savings and environmental protection.

The purpose of the building is to provide a suitable living space for tenants while also protecting the environment around the facility. This will not only benefit the tenants, but also the community at large. With energy costs climbing, a design of this nature is essential for reducing the impact that those costs will have on our society. JJAM hopes to help in providing a better future for the generations to come.

Members: Jason Hamika, Destin Noa Tsala, Jerrid Walker, Aaron Wright
Faculty Advisor: Edmund Yuen

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2008 Steel Bridge

The student steel bridge competition is sponsored by the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) and the American Society of Civil Engineers. The steel bridge project is designed to involve a group of students in the design, analysis, detailing, fabrication, construction, and competition of their bridge. The challenge incorporated by the AISC rules committee is that each team must build a 1/10-scale model steel bridge for the local Department of Transportation. This bridge must be able to resist all load cases proposed and meet all dimensions required.

The 2008 Steel Bridge Team recently won the North Central Regional Conference Competition by placing first in four out of six categories, and will compete in the 2008 National Student Steel Bridge Competition at the University of Florida.

Members: Erica Hume, Michael Mitchell, Jacob Van Horn, Joseph Wallace
Faculty Advisors: Elin Jensen, Stefan Neuhaeuser
Graduate Advisor: Chris Girard

 

Sponsors:
American Institute of Steel Construction Inc.
American Society of Civil Engineers, Committee on Younger Members
The Bowersock Family
Kevin Collins
Great Lakes Fabricators & Erectors Association
HRC
The Hume Family
Lawrence Tech Alumni Association
The Mitchell Family
NTH Consultants, Ltd.
OHM
Ruby & Associates
Schleede Hampton Associates Inc.
Cindy Sikina
SME
Spalding DeDecker Associates, Inc.
The Van Horn Family
Wade Trim
The Wallace Family

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Swartout Estates

Swartout Estates, designed by the team’s company, Sustainable Engineering Solutions Inc., is a 48-acre sustainable subdivision development located in St. Clair County. The design elements incorporated into Swartout Estates include an onsite, chlorinated wastewater treatment facility, bike path surrounding the site, a road with an aesthetic roundabout, and a total of 41 sustainable housing lots. To integrate sustainable engineering practices in the development of Swartout Estates, the design of the wastewater treatment plant incorporates the use of bio-retention cells, low-embodied structural building materials, solar panels to offset the electrical consumption, and green roof technology. The engineering design consists of transportation, geotechnical, structural, environmental, and construction components.

Members: Christal Larkins, Justin McKoan, Clarice Westman, Robert Williams, Cheryl Young
Faculty Advisor: Edmund Yuen

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Village of Milford Central Station

The team’s company, Metropolitan Transit Consultants (MTC), designed and developed a passenger train terminal to promote mass transportation throughout metropolitan Detroit. MTC chose the Village of Milford for its increasing population and need for public transportation for both its residents and commercial businesses. The addition of this passenger terminal promotes the use of mass transportation between the current passenger terminals in Lansing, Detroit, and Flint. It also provides an excellent central location for passengers traveling to and from major southeastern Michigan locations. For this project, four subdisciplines of civil engineering were covered by the design team: construction engineering, structural engineering, environmental engineering, and transportation engineering. Each team member specialized in one of these subdisciplines.

Members: Charles Buhagiar, Greg Carnaghi, Zach Shender, Julie VanderMeer
Faculty Advisor: Elin Jensen

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Civil Engineering Senior Projects 2008


Brandon Township Proposed Parks and Recreation Facilities 
Capital Improvements
2008 Concrete Canoe
Lawrence Tech Housing Complex
LEED Certified Apartment Complex
2008 Steel Bridge
Swartout Estates
Village of Milford Central Station

 




Brandon Township Proposed Parks and Recreation Facilities

The team, Senior Design Associates, designed a parks and recreation facilities development for the Charter Township of Brandon, a continuously expanding community located in northern Oakland County that identified the need for recreation facilities for its residents. The goal of this project was to provide the community with safe, cost-effective, sustainable, and high-quality facilities. These facilities include baseball fields, multi-use athletic fields, pedestrian and bike trails throughout the site, as well an office building with indoor learning facilities. As a sustainable development, some of the green components of the project include using porous pavement, wetland preservation, and providing wastewater treatment in an effort to use gray water for irrigation of the athletic fields. Each student on the team was responsible for a single design component of the engineering solution. These components included construction, transportation, environmental, and water resources engineering.

Members: Kyle Breining, Kelly Jankowski, Robert Randazzo, Brian Zwayer
Faculty Advisor: Donald Carpenter

Top Button

 



Capital Improvements

Associated with the Hines Drive and Middlebelt Crossing

The goal of this project was to help alleviate the roadway flooding on Hines Drive in Westland. Since Hines Drive was constructed in a 100-year floodplain, it is victim to flooding upwards of 35 times per year, causing the roadway to close. This becomes an inconvenience to commuters and frequent users of Hines Park. The location of highest flooding concern on Hines Drive is the area immediately east and west of Middlebelt Road. The members of this project team combined transportation engineering, river engineering, structural engineering, and water resources engineering to design improvements that will reduce roadway flooding to two times or less per year.

Members: Vincent Genco, Phil Mlinarich, James Rowley, Steve Sulzman
Faculty Advisor: Donald Carpenter

Top Button



2008 Concrete Canoe

The concrete canoe is part of a competition sponsored by the American Society of Civil Engineers and BASF Admixtures, Inc. Each year, the Committee of National Concrete Canoe Competitions sets forth rules and regulations that govern canoe dimensions, acceptable materials, and judging criteria. This year’s entry from Lawrence Tech is The Dream Cruise, named after the popular local car event that takes place on Woodward Avenue. The canoe is 19 feet long, 30 inches wide, and 12.5 inches deep. Its stand is constructed to resemble a car and the tabletop display brings back the drive-in movie atmosphere. The competition is judged on four categories: the technical report, the final product (which consists of the finished canoe, a three-foot cutaway representative section of the canoe, and the display table), an oral presentation, and the races. The Dream Cruise expands on the successful features of past designs when it comes to employing new materials and construction techniques. The concrete mix design uses polycarboxylate admixtures that have never been used in Lawrence Tech’s concrete canoe history. The reinforcement is Strux 90/40, a new synthetic macro fiber on the market that has a longer length than most fibers used in concrete, thus improving the tensile strength of the canoe. The hull has a completely new design that features a smooth hull, a soft chine, a shallow arc, and a shallow vee. These characteristics allow for an increase in speed without compromising the stability of the canoe. The form was made using a double tabletop that eased the construction and de-molding process by allowing the upper tabletop to be flipped over.

Members: Gregg Bagby, Tierra Logan, Stan Richard, Chase Whitlatch
Faculty Advisors: Hiroshan Hettiarachchi, Elin Jensen

 

Sponsors:
American Society of Civil Engineers, Southeastern Michigan Branch
Aristeo Construction
BASF Admixtures, Inc.
Dimensional Embroidery
Daniel G. Fredenhall
GBM Recycled Concrete, LLC
Grace Construction Products
Huesker
Lafarge
NTH
Nycon
Ohm
Ruby & Associates
Schleede Hampton
Associates Consulting
Engineers
SME
St Marys Cement

Top Button



Lawrence Tech Housing Complex

The team’s company, Sustainable Engineering, Inc., designed a sustainable housing complex for the Lawrence Technological University campus located at 21000 West Ten Mile Road in Southfield. The proposed structure will be located northwest of the existing University Housing-North complex. This project is based on the increase of residents living on campus and the need for the expansion of university housing. The sustainable design is cost efficient and environmentally friendly and includes a green roof, bio-retention cells, rain garden, solar panels, tree restoration, and recycled materials.

Members: Jessica Berry, Jeremy Miller, Chintan Shah, Corietta Wentum
Faculty Advisor: Hiroshan Hettiarachchi

Top Button


 
LEED Certified Apartment Complex

The team formed the company, JJAM Engineering, to develop a three-story LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certified apartment complex. The site is located in Clinton Township on the corner of Hall Road and Romeo Plank Road. The team has developed a 30-unit steel structure that features geothermal wells used to reduce the amount of energy needed to heat and cool the building. A green roof is being designed to help reduce water runoff. The runoff that is produced from the development will be stored in bio-retention basins, which will decrease the discharge into the surrounding environment. The building will have an elevator and two stairwells and each of the upper level units will have a balcony.

In order to obtain LEED certification, the design must meet the requirements that are placed by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). The design can earn points based on different criteria, and the topics generally involve energy savings and environmental protection.

The purpose of the building is to provide a suitable living space for tenants while also protecting the environment around the facility. This will not only benefit the tenants, but also the community at large. With energy costs climbing, a design of this nature is essential for reducing the impact that those costs will have on our society. JJAM hopes to help in providing a better future for the generations to come.

Members: Jason Hamika, Destin Noa Tsala, Jerrid Walker, Aaron Wright
Faculty Advisor: Edmund Yuen

Top Button



2008 Steel Bridge

The student steel bridge competition is sponsored by the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) and the American Society of Civil Engineers. The steel bridge project is designed to involve a group of students in the design, analysis, detailing, fabrication, construction, and competition of their bridge. The challenge incorporated by the AISC rules committee is that each team must build a 1/10-scale model steel bridge for the local Department of Transportation. This bridge must be able to resist all load cases proposed and meet all dimensions required.

The 2008 Steel Bridge Team recently won the North Central Regional Conference Competition by placing first in four out of six categories, and will compete in the 2008 National Student Steel Bridge Competition at the University of Florida.

Members: Erica Hume, Michael Mitchell, Jacob Van Horn, Joseph Wallace
Faculty Advisors: Elin Jensen, Stefan Neuhaeuser
Graduate Advisor: Chris Girard

 

Sponsors:
American Institute of Steel Construction Inc.
American Society of Civil Engineers, Committee on Younger Members
The Bowersock Family
Kevin Collins
Great Lakes Fabricators & Erectors Association
HRC
The Hume Family
Lawrence Tech Alumni Association
The Mitchell Family
NTH Consultants, Ltd.
OHM
Ruby & Associates
Schleede Hampton Associates Inc.
Cindy Sikina
SME
Spalding DeDecker Associates, Inc.
The Van Horn Family
Wade Trim
The Wallace Family

Top Button



Swartout Estates

Swartout Estates, designed by the team’s company, Sustainable Engineering Solutions Inc., is a 48-acre sustainable subdivision development located in St. Clair County. The design elements incorporated into Swartout Estates include an onsite, chlorinated wastewater treatment facility, bike path surrounding the site, a road with an aesthetic roundabout, and a total of 41 sustainable housing lots. To integrate sustainable engineering practices in the development of Swartout Estates, the design of the wastewater treatment plant incorporates the use of bio-retention cells, low-embodied structural building materials, solar panels to offset the electrical consumption, and green roof technology. The engineering design consists of transportation, geotechnical, structural, environmental, and construction components.

Members: Christal Larkins, Justin McKoan, Clarice Westman, Robert Williams, Cheryl Young
Faculty Advisor: Edmund Yuen

Top Button


 


Village of Milford Central Station

The team’s company, Metropolitan Transit Consultants (MTC), designed and developed a passenger train terminal to promote mass transportation throughout metropolitan Detroit. MTC chose the Village of Milford for its increasing population and need for public transportation for both its residents and commercial businesses. The addition of this passenger terminal promotes the use of mass transportation between the current passenger terminals in Lansing, Detroit, and Flint. It also provides an excellent central location for passengers traveling to and from major southeastern Michigan locations. For this project, four subdisciplines of civil engineering were covered by the design team: construction engineering, structural engineering, environmental engineering, and transportation engineering. Each team member specialized in one of these subdisciplines.

Members: Charles Buhagiar, Greg Carnaghi, Zach Shender, Julie VanderMeer
Faculty Advisor: Elin Jensen

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