senior projects

 Biomedical Engineering Senior Projects 2008

Skin Care Sensor
 

Ultraviolet B (UVB) is one of the most dangerous forms of ultraviolet light. Six percent of the global radiation reaches the ground level and causes sunburns, cataracts, immune system damage, and skin cancer (melanoma). The skin care sensor uses a selective sensor that is susceptible to UVB and when exposed to the sun, transmits a signal. The signal is converted, amplified, filtered, and processed through a microcontroller. The microcontroller analyzes the signal, displays the UV index on an LCD screen, and makes recommendations to the proper sun block and protection factor to use in order to keep the skin protected while being exposed to the sun.


Members:
Mohamad Farhat, Michael Sarkis
Faculty Advisors: Ronald Foster, Richard Johnston

 
Tracheotomy Suction Device

Many patients with respiratory ailments or injuries require the placement of a tracheotomy in order to ensure proper breathing. Though this is often a short-term solution, many are left with a tracheotomy for the rest of their lives. Because some are unable to cough normally, these patients’ throats can become occluded with mucus or other secretions, which must be suctioned out. The aim was to develop a portable device that tracheotomy patients can use to remove these secretions from their throats and restore a proper airway. The device operates by a simple vacuum pump that uses a catheter to collect secretions in a collection bottle, which then can be easily removed and either emptied or replaced. Though some similar devices exist on the market today, this product offers several notable improvements over the current models. In addition to being more discreet and portable than current devices, it has several safety features, such as a bottle-full indicator and automatic shutoff.

Members: Nathaniel Jakinovich, David Whitney
Faculty Advisors: Kenneth Cook, Greg Feierfeil, Anca Stefan

 Biomedical Engineering Senior Projects 2008

Skin Care Sensor
 

Ultraviolet B (UVB) is one of the most dangerous forms of ultraviolet light. Six percent of the global radiation reaches the ground level and causes sunburns, cataracts, immune system damage, and skin cancer (melanoma). The skin care sensor uses a selective sensor that is susceptible to UVB and when exposed to the sun, transmits a signal. The signal is converted, amplified, filtered, and processed through a microcontroller. The microcontroller analyzes the signal, displays the UV index on an LCD screen, and makes recommendations to the proper sun block and protection factor to use in order to keep the skin protected while being exposed to the sun.


Members:
Mohamad Farhat, Michael Sarkis
Faculty Advisors: Ronald Foster, Richard Johnston

 
Tracheotomy Suction Device

Many patients with respiratory ailments or injuries require the placement of a tracheotomy in order to ensure proper breathing. Though this is often a short-term solution, many are left with a tracheotomy for the rest of their lives. Because some are unable to cough normally, these patients’ throats can become occluded with mucus or other secretions, which must be suctioned out. The aim was to develop a portable device that tracheotomy patients can use to remove these secretions from their throats and restore a proper airway. The device operates by a simple vacuum pump that uses a catheter to collect secretions in a collection bottle, which then can be easily removed and either emptied or replaced. Though some similar devices exist on the market today, this product offers several notable improvements over the current models. In addition to being more discreet and portable than current devices, it has several safety features, such as a bottle-full indicator and automatic shutoff.

Members: Nathaniel Jakinovich, David Whitney
Faculty Advisors: Kenneth Cook, Greg Feierfeil, Anca Stefan