ask the professor - arts + sciences

asktheprof

Engaging students to embrace learning and pursue a higher education in the liberal arts can be challenging. Many students remain unaware of the career opportunities available in the liberal arts and sciences. Recent employer surveys indicate, however, that liberal arts graduates are highly valued for their breadth and depth of knowledge and well-developed critical thinking and communication skills.

Lawrence Technological University’s College of Arts and Sciences can help you open your students’ eyes to new possibilities with “Ask the Professor,” a program that provides educators access to engaging, high-caliber speakers. Offered free of charge, “Ask the Professor” presenters speak on a variety of topics that can complement your scheduled lesson plans. These dynamic, interactive sessions are specially designed for students who are juniors and seniors in high school, but they can be modified for sophomores or mixed audiences.

Choose a presentation and book your speaker by contacting Lawrence Tech’s College of Arts and Sciences at 248.204.3541 or scidean@ltu.edu.

 

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Getting Started

To arrange for a professor to visit your classroom or for more information about the “Ask the Professor” program, contact Lawrence Tech’s College of Arts and Sciences at 248.204.3541 or scidean@ltu.edu. For more information about the College of Arts and Sciences, visit ltu.edu/arts_sciences.


The Presentations

“The Entrepreneur”
  Length: 2 hours, but can be shortened
  60 students maximum
Led by a Lawrence Tech management professor, students form fictional corporations and engage in a business competition similar to the television show “The Apprentice.” During the exercise, students learn the importance of such business skills as leadership, project management, marketing, and organization.

Social Media for the Win: Use YouTube and Facebook to Get into College and Win Competitions
  Length: 30 minutes to 1 hour
  Multimedia, suitable for all groups
Social media tools, such as Facebook and YouTube, are used by hundreds of millions of people all over the world to keep in touch with friends and family. Students learn how not to use these tools, and how to use them productively to find information and career opportunities. Also discussed is how employers and college admissions officers use these tools to find out more about their applicants.

Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery
  Length: 45–60 minutes
  Multimedia, interactive
How are new drugs to treat disease discovered? In this presentation, the emerging discipline of chemical biology and its role in the development of new pharmaceuticals will be explored. There is an increasing need for scientists well versed in both biology and chemistry who use chemical tools to solve biological problems.

Designing Computer Games
  Length: 45 minutes to 1 hour
  Multimedia, interactive
Creating a computer game from concept to product requires training across a broad range of academic disciplines, such as computer science, art, humanities, technical communication, and psychology. In this presentation, students gain an appreciation for the complexities of the digital media industry by proposing a concept for a computer game and then mapping out the basic steps required to produce it for the retail market.

Digital Communications
  Length: 30 minutes to 1 hour
The quality and speed of communication systems are constantly improving with satellite television, 4G – and 5G – cell phones, and super-high-speed Internet. Learn the fascinating history of how digital communications developed, from the pioneering work of Michigander Claude E. Shannon to two recent breakthroughs that have completely revolutionized the way people think about communications.

Legal ABCs
  Length: 1 hour
  Multimedia, suitable for all groups
An attorney discusses legal issues high schoolers may face, from accepting personal responsibility and facing the consequences for one’s actions, to copyright infringement (music and video), traffic tickets, and employment law and minimum wage.

It’s My Story and I’m Sticking to It
  Length: 30 minutes to 1 hour
From social media to mass media, stories are the primary way we communicate effectively. The literature we read in English classes helps us to frame our best essays and oral presentations. Students learn how to use stories (personal and traditional) as a communication tool for everything from their Facebook page to college application essays to creative writing and forensic competition.

Media Gone Wild
  Length: 30–45 minutes
The media influences the way we think, vote, and buy. This dynamic field encompasses every communication platform from network and cable television, radio, film, music, news, and magazines to the Internet. The industry has created an ever-growing need for professionals in television, video, and web production. Learn how the industry has changed and what skills it now demands from college graduates who wish to pursue careers in the media.

Physics
The study of physics prepares students for employment or graduate study in a wide range of fields, including computer-based industrial research and development, nuclear science, optical science, geophysics, nuclear medicine, science education, patent and industrial law, and astronomy.

“What If You Could Drill a Hole through the Earth?”
  Length: Approximately 45 minutes
  Multimedia (projector with laptop connectivity required)
Starting with this hypothetical question, students explore Newton’s laws regarding gravity and energy. Other questions considered are: How much time would it take for you to fall all the way through? If you stopped at the center, would you feel gravity? If you leaped outward from the center, how far could you leap on your first try? How many times would you leap before you got out of the hole?

“Hey, Where Did That Star Go?”
  Length: Approximately 45 minutes
  Multimedia (projector with laptop connectivity required)
What is the typical life cycle of a star? This presentation follows the life of a star from its birth as a hydrogen cloud to a proto-star to its death-throes and formation into a black hole or a neutron star. The life cycles of planets are also discussed.

“Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star, I Wonder How Fast You Are?”
  Length: Approximately 45 minutes
  Multimedia (projector with laptop connectivity required), interactive
The information we get from the Universe comes to us as light (or electromagnetic radiation). That’s all we get, so we must squeeze as much information out of it as possible! Students will observe the spectrum of wavelengths (colors) of light from different gasses and then explore how we are able to tell if stars are moving toward us or away from us. They also will learn why physicists believe the Universe is expanding!

“The Science of Sound”
  Length: Approximately 45 minutes
  Multimedia (projector with laptop connectivity required), interactive
Using a microphone and special software to explore the digital spectrum of sounds, students learn about the physics of sound and the basic characteristics of sound, such as frequency, wavelength, amplitude, intensity, and speed. Students are welcome to bring in their musical instruments to record.

“Why Does Marvin the Martian Want to Move?”
  Length: Approximately 45 minutes
  Multimedia (projector with laptop connectivity required)
Marvin really enjoys seeing Venus from his home on Mars, but there are times when the Earth blocks his view. How often does this happen? Students explore how the planets travel in space, what paths they take, and why.

“… And Go Get Yourself Some Cheap Sunglasses”
  Length: Approximately 45 minutes
  Multimedia (projector with laptop connectivity required), interactive
While ZZ Top may recommend cheap sunglasses, there are very good reasons to get expensive ones. In this introduction to optics, the behavior and properties of light are explored. Students learn about polarization and why ultraviolet coatings on sunglasses protect the eyes. Also discussed are the physiology of the eye and why some people are nearsighted and some are farsighted.

“Overdamped, Underdamped, and Driven, Oh My!”
  Length: Approximately 45 minutes
  Multimedia (projector with laptop connectivity required)
When we drive a car, the engine propels us. However, within the car’s engine and very structure – and in its movement through space – there are a number of conditions that slow its speed. This “dampening” effect (friction) exists everywhere in nature and will be explored in this presentation.

The Wide World of Psychology
  Length: 90 minutes
  Multimedia, interactive
Students navigate the huge field of psychology and the career choices it offers: clinical psychology, social psychology, developmental psychology, industrial/organizational psychology, and behavioral neuroscience. Such topics as brain chemistry, animal behavior, sensation and perception, and research methods are also covered.

Lawrence Technological University offers over 100 undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral degree programs in Colleges of Architecture and Design, Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Management. Founded in 1932, the 4,500-student, private university pioneered evening classes and today has a growing number of weekend and online programs. In addition to those available at Lawrence Tech’s 102-acre Southfield campus, programs are offered in Detroit, Lansing, Petoskey, and Traverse City. Lawrence Tech also partners with universities in Canada, Mexico, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia.