undergraduate management programs

Using Your Electives

One unique aspect of the Undergraduate Management Programs is the inclusion of at least 30 elective credits. The elective credit hours allow you to customize your academic experience to meet your career goals.

The opportunity to select electives can feel a bit daunting -- How do you choose which classes will best fit your path? What is the difference between a "general" elective and a "focused" elective? Should you pursue a minor?

While your academic advisor is of course available to help you navigate the choices, it is helpful to have a general idea of what you can do to make the best use of the elective hours in your program.

This "Using Your Electives" guide provides answers to some common questions, an overview of minors that are available, and other things to consider when choosing your electives. This guide is not a replacement for meeting with your academic advisor and keeping an eye on the schedule each semester.

 Topics:

General vs Focused Electives

Both the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and Bachelor of Science in Information Technology programs include 15 credit hours of general electives, along with a set of focused electives. General elective credits are fulfilled by taking any course at Lawrence Tech that is at the freshman level or above (so, the course number starts with a number higher than "0"), is credit-bearing (so, the course number ends with a number higher than "0") for which you meet the associated prerequisites. Focused elective hours are satisfied by taking courses closely related to your major. Your advisor can help you determine what courses those might be. in general, courses in Accounting (ACC), Management (MGT), Human Resources (HRM), Operations Management (OPM), and Information Technology (INT) will fit your focused elective requirements.

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Minors

A minor is essentially a "mini-major," and usually requires about twelve credit hours of coursework. You can often use your elective credits to obtain a minor. Lawrence Tech offers a variety of minors; the list below provides an overview of those minors most closely related to the Undergraduate Management Programs.

Your transcript will indicate any minors that you complete. As such, you should officially declare a minor once you have decided to pursue one. There is a form [PDF] in the One Stop Center that you can complete to declare your minor. You do not need to complete this form if you are not pursuing one of the official minors at Lawrence Tech.

Economics

Recommended for students with an interest in economics, or who plan to pursue careers in government, public service, banking, or related fields.

Required courses:

  • MCS1214 Intro to Math Analysis 1 (already required for all UMP students)
  • MCS1224 Intro to Math Analysis 2 (already required for all UMP students)
  • SSC2303 Principles of Economics (already required for Business Management students; counts as a focused elective for IT students)
  • 4 additional economics courses at the 3000 or 4000 level (one course in this set may satisfy your Junior/Senior SSC/LLT/PSY Elective)

back to Minors list

English

Recommended for students with an interest in writing, literature and developing critical thinking skills, or students who want to pursue a career in the publishing industry

Required courses:

  • LLT1213 World Masterpieces 1 (already required for all UMP students)
  • LLT1223 World Masterpieces 2 (already required for all UMP students)
  • 5 upper-division English courses (one course in this set may satisfy your Junior/Senior SSC/LLT/PSY Elective)

back to Minors list

History

Recommended for students with an interest in history, or who plan to pursue careers in business, education, government, public policy, and related disciplines, or for students who wish to develop their critical thinking skills. May also work with the Pre-Law Concentration.

Required courses:

  • SSC2413 Foundations of the American Experience (already required for all UMP students)
  • SSC2423 Development of the American Experience (already required for all UMP students)
  • 5 upper-division courses in history (one course in this set may satisfy your Junior/Senior SSC/LLT/PSY Elective)

back to Minors list

Philosophy

Recommended for students with an interest in philosophy, an interest in developing critical thinking skills, or for students interested in pursuing careers in business, education, government or public policy. May also work with the Pre-Law concentration.

Required courses:

  • SSC2413 Foundations of the American Experience (already required for all UMP students)
  • SSC2423 Development of the American Experience (already required for all UMP students)
  • 5 upper-division philosophy courses (which may include SSC3723 Ethics, SSC3733 Aesthetics, MCS1203 Logic)(one course in this set may satisfy your Junior/Senior SSC/LLT/PSY Elective)

back to Minors list

Psychology

Recommended for students with an interest in psychology, and for students who wish to pursue managerial or human resources positions

Required courses:

  • PSY1213 Introduction to Psychology
  • PSY3113 Research Methods for the Behavioral Sciences (may satisfy your Junior/Senior SSC/LLT/PSY Elective)
  • MCSXXX4 Biostatistics
  • 4 upper-division psychology courses (which may include PSY3323 Organizational Psychology) (one course in this set may satisfy your Junior/Senior SSC/LLT/PSY Elective)

back to Minors list

Technical and Professional Communication

Highly recommended for IT students, and for all students who wish to develop their presentation and communication skills. Students will develop the ability to communicate complex concepts to a variety of audiences. Also recommended for students interested in pursing careers in public relations, advertising, and management.

Required courses:

  • COM2103 Technical and Professional Communication (already required for all UMP students)
  • COM2113 Speech (already required for Business Management students; may count as a focused elective for IT students)
  • COM3553 Interpersonal and Nonverbal Communication or COM3563 Collaborative Communication for Leaders
  • 3 additional COM courses at the 2000 level or above (may include COM3113 Creative Entrepreneurship)

back to Minors list

Spanish

Recommended for students who wish to develop proficiency in the third most spoken language in the world. Placement examinations are available to determine with which course you will begin the program. May include study abroad opportunities.

Required courses:

  • SPN2913 Spanish 1
  • SPN2923 Spanish 2
  • SPN3833 Spanish 3
  • SPN3843 Spanish 4
  • SPN4833 Business in Latin America (may apply to focused electives) or SPN4843 Spanish Masterpieces

back to Minors list

Business Management

Not available to Business Management students. Recommended for IT students who are interested in pursuing a managerial or executive position, or who plan to manage IT infrastructure in a business environment. All courses can apply to focused electives in the IT program

Required courses:

  • MGT1212 Business Issues and Practices
  • SSC2303 Principles of Economics
  • 5 upper-division courses in management or human resources (including at least one course each in HRM-leadership and Entrepreneurship)

back to Minors list

Entrepreneurial Leadership

Under development. Will provide students in both programs with background in leadership and entrepreneurship to enable students to start or work for entrepreneurial firms.

back to Minors list

Computer Science

IT or Business students can strengthen their technical knowledge and prepare for a career in software programming with a certificate or minor in computer science. All courses can apply to focused or general electives in either program.

Requires 24 credits of Computer Science courses.

 back to Minors list

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Types of Electives

 Employers look for applicants who have both depth of knowledge in their chosen fields and a breadth of knowledge across other disciplines. Employers also highly value applicants who have strong skills in oral and written communication. The list below provides an overview of types of electives available to you at Lawrence Tech, and how those electives might help you develop your personal and professional path. Since elective course offerings vary semester to semester, it is important to consult the course schedule and meet with your academic advisor.

Students who have earned 60 credit hours or more toward their degree and have a GPA of 3.0 or above may be eligible to take certain graduate courses as part of their elective work. This could get you started on your MBA, MSIS or other advanced degree. Consult your advisor for details.

Types of Elective Courses:

  • IT students may take any course(s) in the pre-core or core of the Business Management curriculum as part of their electives
  • Business Management students may take any course(s) in the pre-core or core of the IT curriculum as part of their electives
  • Courses in Communication ("COM"), including Collaborative Communication for Leaders, Technical Editing, and Creative Entrepreneurship, help you develop your speaking and writing skills, while showing employers that you take communication seriously
  • Courses in Creative Writing ("CRW") allow you to develop your writing and story-telling skills, which are absolutely essential in business. Students interested in PR or advertising are especially encouraged to take these courses
  • Courses in Human Resources ("HRM"), including Organizational Development, develop your abilities to effectively lead and manage individuals and teams
  • Courses in Literature ("LLT"), including seminars in Literature, help you augment your critical thinking, analytical and writing skills
  • Courses in Management ("MGT"), including International Business, expose you to the abilities needed to manage a business
  • Courses in Marketing ("MKT"), including Sales and Marketing for Entrepreneurs, provide you with knowledge of key concepts in marketing a company's product or service
  • Courses in Mathematics and Computer Science ("MCS") help you develop your abilities in software programming (including game development, computer networks, etc.) and advanced concepts in mathematics. Courses like Logic can help prepare you for the GMAT (Graduate Management Admissions Test)
  • Courses in Media Communication ("MCO"), including Social Media and Writing for Media, underscore how business and the media interact, and how businesses can use the media to tell their story
  • Courses in Psychology ("PSY"), including Organizational Psychology, help you gain an understanding of different personality types, what motivates people to act, and other skills that will serve you well in a supervisory capacity
  • The recent crisis on Wall Street showed just how intertwined the business world is with society and politics as a whole. Courses in Social Science ("SSC"), including Ethics, Problems in International Politics, and Money & Banking, develop your critical thinking and analytical skills, enhance your written communication skills, and encourage you to understand how our political and social systems function 

back to top

Natural Science Courses

For both the Information Technology and Management programs, you must take 7 credits of natural science, including 1 laboratory credit. Below is a list of common courses selected by your peers. Of course, you are welcome to enroll in higher-level science courses provided you have the appropriate prerequisites. "00" courses (courses whose first digit is 0) do NOT apply toward your natural science requirements.

4-credit courses (courses ending in the number "4") satisfy one natural science course and one laboratory course requirement.

  

  • BIO1153 Intro to Biological Principles (No prerequisite. Fundamentals of biological terminology, elementary chemistry as it pertains to biology, cell structure, osmosis and diffusion, metabolism, fundamentals of heredity and genetics, and current biological topics in the news (such as cloning, invasive species, personalized medicine, global warming, biofuels etc.))
  • CHM1154 Intro to Chemistry Principles (Prerequisite: at least MCS0054. Fundamentals of chemical terminology, stoichiometry calculations, atomic structure, chemical bonding, gases, solution chemistry, and the chemistry of metals and non-metals.)
  • FSC1214 Forensic Science (Forensic science is the application of scientific principles to the criminal justice system. This course introduces students to the field of forensics through an exploration of the biological, chemical and physical principles underlying criminal investigations. Topics may include fingerprinting, DNS analysis, firearms and ballistics, entomology, glass analysis, blood, hair and fiber analysis. A laboratory component will introduce the latest technology, procedures and limitations of forensic science with the collection and analysis of evidence using crime scene simulations. No background in natural science is presumed.)
  • GLG1103 Geology (No prerequisite. Minerals; igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rock formations and processes. Glaciation, ground water, water resources, mass wasting and volcanology. Case studies of practical geology problems.)
  • PHY1154 Intro to Physics Principles (Prerequisite: MCS1214 Math Analysis 1. Must have experience with computers. An introduction to mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism.)
  • PHY1213 Introductory Astronomy (Prerequisite: At least MCS0054. A survey of contemporary knowledge of the nature and the evolution of planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. Topics include stellar evolution, the origin of the elements, the deaths of stars, black holes, the structure of the Milky Way galaxy, other galaxies, dark matter, the expanding universe and the big bang.)
  • PHY1221 Introductory Astronomy Lab (A companion laboratory experience to the Introductory Astronomy lecture class (PHY1213). Experiments include hands-on and online activities and astronomy software explorations of seasons, phases of moon, eclipses, solar system formations, stellar evolution, black holes, and Hubble's Law.)

Opportunities Outside the Classroom

 

 

Lawrence Tech is serious about encouraging you to obtain practical experience in your field. In addition to the opportunity to earn up to 6 credit hours through internships (paid or unpaid), the following options can help you achieve your goals.

Technical Certifications

If you obtain select certifications -- such as A+, CCNA, etc. -- you may be able to receive up to 9 credit hours toward your electives. See your advisor for questions about specific certifications.

Study Abroad

Business and information technology are truly global disciplines. Enhance your knowledge of other cultures and methods through taking advantage of one of LTU's many study abroad opportunities. Some are lengthy and allow you to obtain a full semester or year of academic credit in places like England and Germany; others are shorter and allow you to complete one or two courses in places like Paris; and others are only a few weeks but provide you the opportunity of a lifetime to visit and complete service projects in China and Haiti. Visit the Study Abroad website for more details on upcoming opportunities. Your time at a university is one of the few opportunities you will have to take advantage of the ability to travel the world -- use it!

Pre-Law Concentration

The American Bar Association has indicated that there is no particular undergraduate degree that students who are interested in law should pursue. Indeed, the breadth of practice areas in the legal field demands that the profession be made up of individuals from a diversity of backgrounds. The law needs engineers, scientists, technologists, businesspeople, and psychologists as much as it needs historians and political scientists. That said, the study of law is uniquely challenging. Taking time during your undergraduate program to develop key skills that will serve you well in law school and beyond is wise. If you do not enjoy engaging in challenging reading, learned debate and critical thinking, you will likely not enjoy law school. Courses that challenge you to think critically, analyze complex problems and closely read a variety of texts will help prepare you for a future in law. Contact the pre-law advisor to discuss what courses might best fit your goals.

back to top

Contacting Your Advisor

When all is said and done, your goals are uniquely yours. Take time each semester to meet with your academic advisor, who can help you discern the most appropriate path to your desired future.

Undergraduate Management Program Advisors:

All students who have earned less than 60 credits toward their degree: Dr. Evans. S207C. 248.204.3508. kevans [at] ltu [dot] edu

All students who have earned more than 60 credits toward their degree: Amanda Falkenbury. M312A. 248.204.3099. afalkenbu [at] ltu [dot[ edu

back to top

Using Your Electives

One unique aspect of the Undergraduate Management Programs is the inclusion of at least 30 elective credits. The elective credit hours allow you to customize your academic experience to meet your career goals.

The opportunity to select electives can feel a bit daunting -- How do you choose which classes will best fit your path? What is the difference between a "general" elective and a "focused" elective? Should you pursue a minor?

While your academic advisor is of course available to help you navigate the choices, it is helpful to have a general idea of what you can do to make the best use of the elective hours in your program.

This "Using Your Electives" guide provides answers to some common questions, an overview of minors that are available, and other things to consider when choosing your electives. This guide is not a replacement for meeting with your academic advisor and keeping an eye on the schedule each semester.

 Topics:

General vs Focused Electives

Both the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and Bachelor of Science in Information Technology programs include 15 credit hours of general electives, along with a set of focused electives. General elective credits are fulfilled by taking any course at Lawrence Tech that is at the freshman level or above (so, the course number starts with a number higher than "0"), is credit-bearing (so, the course number ends with a number higher than "0") for which you meet the associated prerequisites. Focused elective hours are satisfied by taking courses closely related to your major. Your advisor can help you determine what courses those might be. in general, courses in Accounting (ACC), Management (MGT), Human Resources (HRM), Operations Management (OPM), and Information Technology (INT) will fit your focused elective requirements.

back to top

Minors

A minor is essentially a "mini-major," and usually requires about twelve credit hours of coursework. You can often use your elective credits to obtain a minor. Lawrence Tech offers a variety of minors; the list below provides an overview of those minors most closely related to the Undergraduate Management Programs.

Your transcript will indicate any minors that you complete. As such, you should officially declare a minor once you have decided to pursue one. There is a form [PDF] in the One Stop Center that you can complete to declare your minor. You do not need to complete this form if you are not pursuing one of the official minors at Lawrence Tech.

Economics

Recommended for students with an interest in economics, or who plan to pursue careers in government, public service, banking, or related fields.

Required courses:

  • MCS1214 Intro to Math Analysis 1 (already required for all UMP students)
  • MCS1224 Intro to Math Analysis 2 (already required for all UMP students)
  • SSC2303 Principles of Economics (already required for Business Management students; counts as a focused elective for IT students)
  • 4 additional economics courses at the 3000 or 4000 level (one course in this set may satisfy your Junior/Senior SSC/LLT/PSY Elective)

back to Minors list

English

Recommended for students with an interest in writing, literature and developing critical thinking skills, or students who want to pursue a career in the publishing industry

Required courses:

  • LLT1213 World Masterpieces 1 (already required for all UMP students)
  • LLT1223 World Masterpieces 2 (already required for all UMP students)
  • 5 upper-division English courses (one course in this set may satisfy your Junior/Senior SSC/LLT/PSY Elective)

back to Minors list

History

Recommended for students with an interest in history, or who plan to pursue careers in business, education, government, public policy, and related disciplines, or for students who wish to develop their critical thinking skills. May also work with the Pre-Law Concentration.

Required courses:

  • SSC2413 Foundations of the American Experience (already required for all UMP students)
  • SSC2423 Development of the American Experience (already required for all UMP students)
  • 5 upper-division courses in history (one course in this set may satisfy your Junior/Senior SSC/LLT/PSY Elective)

back to Minors list

Philosophy

Recommended for students with an interest in philosophy, an interest in developing critical thinking skills, or for students interested in pursuing careers in business, education, government or public policy. May also work with the Pre-Law concentration.

Required courses:

  • SSC2413 Foundations of the American Experience (already required for all UMP students)
  • SSC2423 Development of the American Experience (already required for all UMP students)
  • 5 upper-division philosophy courses (which may include SSC3723 Ethics, SSC3733 Aesthetics, MCS1203 Logic)(one course in this set may satisfy your Junior/Senior SSC/LLT/PSY Elective)

back to Minors list

Psychology

Recommended for students with an interest in psychology, and for students who wish to pursue managerial or human resources positions

Required courses:

  • PSY1213 Introduction to Psychology
  • PSY3113 Research Methods for the Behavioral Sciences (may satisfy your Junior/Senior SSC/LLT/PSY Elective)
  • MCSXXX4 Biostatistics
  • 4 upper-division psychology courses (which may include PSY3323 Organizational Psychology) (one course in this set may satisfy your Junior/Senior SSC/LLT/PSY Elective)

back to Minors list

Technical and Professional Communication

Highly recommended for IT students, and for all students who wish to develop their presentation and communication skills. Students will develop the ability to communicate complex concepts to a variety of audiences. Also recommended for students interested in pursing careers in public relations, advertising, and management.

Required courses:

  • COM2103 Technical and Professional Communication (already required for all UMP students)
  • COM2113 Speech (already required for Business Management students; may count as a focused elective for IT students)
  • COM3553 Interpersonal and Nonverbal Communication or COM3563 Collaborative Communication for Leaders
  • 3 additional COM courses at the 2000 level or above (may include COM3113 Creative Entrepreneurship)

back to Minors list

Spanish

Recommended for students who wish to develop proficiency in the third most spoken language in the world. Placement examinations are available to determine with which course you will begin the program. May include study abroad opportunities.

Required courses:

  • SPN2913 Spanish 1
  • SPN2923 Spanish 2
  • SPN3833 Spanish 3
  • SPN3843 Spanish 4
  • SPN4833 Business in Latin America (may apply to focused electives) or SPN4843 Spanish Masterpieces

back to Minors list

Business Management

Not available to Business Management students. Recommended for IT students who are interested in pursuing a managerial or executive position, or who plan to manage IT infrastructure in a business environment. All courses can apply to focused electives in the IT program

Required courses:

  • MGT1212 Business Issues and Practices
  • SSC2303 Principles of Economics
  • 5 upper-division courses in management or human resources (including at least one course each in HRM-leadership and Entrepreneurship)

back to Minors list

Entrepreneurial Leadership

Under development. Will provide students in both programs with background in leadership and entrepreneurship to enable students to start or work for entrepreneurial firms.

back to Minors list

Computer Science

IT or Business students can strengthen their technical knowledge and prepare for a career in software programming with a certificate or minor in computer science. All courses can apply to focused or general electives in either program.

Requires 24 credits of Computer Science courses.

 back to Minors list

back to top

Types of Electives

 Employers look for applicants who have both depth of knowledge in their chosen fields and a breadth of knowledge across other disciplines. Employers also highly value applicants who have strong skills in oral and written communication. The list below provides an overview of types of electives available to you at Lawrence Tech, and how those electives might help you develop your personal and professional path. Since elective course offerings vary semester to semester, it is important to consult the course schedule and meet with your academic advisor.

Students who have earned 60 credit hours or more toward their degree and have a GPA of 3.0 or above may be eligible to take certain graduate courses as part of their elective work. This could get you started on your MBA, MSIS or other advanced degree. Consult your advisor for details.

Types of Elective Courses:

  • IT students may take any course(s) in the pre-core or core of the Business Management curriculum as part of their electives
  • Business Management students may take any course(s) in the pre-core or core of the IT curriculum as part of their electives
  • Courses in Communication ("COM"), including Collaborative Communication for Leaders, Technical Editing, and Creative Entrepreneurship, help you develop your speaking and writing skills, while showing employers that you take communication seriously
  • Courses in Creative Writing ("CRW") allow you to develop your writing and story-telling skills, which are absolutely essential in business. Students interested in PR or advertising are especially encouraged to take these courses
  • Courses in Human Resources ("HRM"), including Organizational Development, develop your abilities to effectively lead and manage individuals and teams
  • Courses in Literature ("LLT"), including seminars in Literature, help you augment your critical thinking, analytical and writing skills
  • Courses in Management ("MGT"), including International Business, expose you to the abilities needed to manage a business
  • Courses in Marketing ("MKT"), including Sales and Marketing for Entrepreneurs, provide you with knowledge of key concepts in marketing a company's product or service
  • Courses in Mathematics and Computer Science ("MCS") help you develop your abilities in software programming (including game development, computer networks, etc.) and advanced concepts in mathematics. Courses like Logic can help prepare you for the GMAT (Graduate Management Admissions Test)
  • Courses in Media Communication ("MCO"), including Social Media and Writing for Media, underscore how business and the media interact, and how businesses can use the media to tell their story
  • Courses in Psychology ("PSY"), including Organizational Psychology, help you gain an understanding of different personality types, what motivates people to act, and other skills that will serve you well in a supervisory capacity
  • The recent crisis on Wall Street showed just how intertwined the business world is with society and politics as a whole. Courses in Social Science ("SSC"), including Ethics, Problems in International Politics, and Money & Banking, develop your critical thinking and analytical skills, enhance your written communication skills, and encourage you to understand how our political and social systems function 

back to top

Natural Science Courses

For both the Information Technology and Management programs, you must take 7 credits of natural science, including 1 laboratory credit. Below is a list of common courses selected by your peers. Of course, you are welcome to enroll in higher-level science courses provided you have the appropriate prerequisites. "00" courses (courses whose first digit is 0) do NOT apply toward your natural science requirements.

4-credit courses (courses ending in the number "4") satisfy one natural science course and one laboratory course requirement.

  

  • BIO1153 Intro to Biological Principles (No prerequisite. Fundamentals of biological terminology, elementary chemistry as it pertains to biology, cell structure, osmosis and diffusion, metabolism, fundamentals of heredity and genetics, and current biological topics in the news (such as cloning, invasive species, personalized medicine, global warming, biofuels etc.))
  • CHM1154 Intro to Chemistry Principles (Prerequisite: at least MCS0054. Fundamentals of chemical terminology, stoichiometry calculations, atomic structure, chemical bonding, gases, solution chemistry, and the chemistry of metals and non-metals.)
  • FSC1214 Forensic Science (Forensic science is the application of scientific principles to the criminal justice system. This course introduces students to the field of forensics through an exploration of the biological, chemical and physical principles underlying criminal investigations. Topics may include fingerprinting, DNS analysis, firearms and ballistics, entomology, glass analysis, blood, hair and fiber analysis. A laboratory component will introduce the latest technology, procedures and limitations of forensic science with the collection and analysis of evidence using crime scene simulations. No background in natural science is presumed.)
  • GLG1103 Geology (No prerequisite. Minerals; igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rock formations and processes. Glaciation, ground water, water resources, mass wasting and volcanology. Case studies of practical geology problems.)
  • PHY1154 Intro to Physics Principles (Prerequisite: MCS1214 Math Analysis 1. Must have experience with computers. An introduction to mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism.)
  • PHY1213 Introductory Astronomy (Prerequisite: At least MCS0054. A survey of contemporary knowledge of the nature and the evolution of planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. Topics include stellar evolution, the origin of the elements, the deaths of stars, black holes, the structure of the Milky Way galaxy, other galaxies, dark matter, the expanding universe and the big bang.)
  • PHY1221 Introductory Astronomy Lab (A companion laboratory experience to the Introductory Astronomy lecture class (PHY1213). Experiments include hands-on and online activities and astronomy software explorations of seasons, phases of moon, eclipses, solar system formations, stellar evolution, black holes, and Hubble's Law.)

Opportunities Outside the Classroom

 

 

Lawrence Tech is serious about encouraging you to obtain practical experience in your field. In addition to the opportunity to earn up to 6 credit hours through internships (paid or unpaid), the following options can help you achieve your goals.

Technical Certifications

If you obtain select certifications -- such as A+, CCNA, etc. -- you may be able to receive up to 9 credit hours toward your electives. See your advisor for questions about specific certifications.

Study Abroad

Business and information technology are truly global disciplines. Enhance your knowledge of other cultures and methods through taking advantage of one of LTU's many study abroad opportunities. Some are lengthy and allow you to obtain a full semester or year of academic credit in places like England and Germany; others are shorter and allow you to complete one or two courses in places like Paris; and others are only a few weeks but provide you the opportunity of a lifetime to visit and complete service projects in China and Haiti. Visit the Study Abroad website for more details on upcoming opportunities. Your time at a university is one of the few opportunities you will have to take advantage of the ability to travel the world -- use it!

Pre-Law Concentration

The American Bar Association has indicated that there is no particular undergraduate degree that students who are interested in law should pursue. Indeed, the breadth of practice areas in the legal field demands that the profession be made up of individuals from a diversity of backgrounds. The law needs engineers, scientists, technologists, businesspeople, and psychologists as much as it needs historians and political scientists. That said, the study of law is uniquely challenging. Taking time during your undergraduate program to develop key skills that will serve you well in law school and beyond is wise. If you do not enjoy engaging in challenging reading, learned debate and critical thinking, you will likely not enjoy law school. Courses that challenge you to think critically, analyze complex problems and closely read a variety of texts will help prepare you for a future in law. Contact the pre-law advisor to discuss what courses might best fit your goals.

back to top

Contacting Your Advisor

When all is said and done, your goals are uniquely yours. Take time each semester to meet with your academic advisor, who can help you discern the most appropriate path to your desired future.

Undergraduate Management Program Advisors:

All students who have earned less than 60 credits toward their degree: Dr. Evans. S207C. 248.204.3508. kevans [at] ltu [dot] edu

All students who have earned more than 60 credits toward their degree: Amanda Falkenbury. M312A. 248.204.3099. afalkenbu [at] ltu [dot[ edu

back to top