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"Halfway to Infinity" on display at LTU

Release Date: January 14, 2013

Halfway to Infinity

“Halfway to Infinity” by Shawn Lawson is on display through Feb. 10 in the College of Architecture and Design’s LEVEL Gallery by the elevators on the first, third, and fourth levels of the University Technology and Learning Center.

Using the circle shape as a base, it attempts to reach the infinitely small by recursively reducing the diameter of a circle by one-half. Starting in the center with one large circle, three areas are created and divided into smaller and smaller inside/outside circle shapes with three pattern techniques.

This display is inspired by Christopher Alexander’s “The Nature of Order” book series where he develops and explains 15 properties of natural order.

Lawson is an experiential media artist working in visual, conceptual, and kinesthetic modes. His artwork explores the effects on consciousness, perceptions of time and space, our daily experience, and patterns of behavior from technologies like: stereoscopy, camera vision, touch screens, wireless and hands-free game controllers, mobile devices, random number generators, and real-time computer graphics.

His artwork has been exhibited in museums, galleries, festivals, and public space in England, Russia, Italy, Korea, Portugal, Brazil, Turkey, Malaysia and the United States. Lawson’s collaborative, Crudeoils, critiques structures of power: surveillance, economic exploitation, and authoritarian corruption. The collaborative is represented by Dean Jensen Gallery. He has been awarded grants from the Electronic Media and Film Program at the New York State Council on the Arts and the Experimental Television Center’s Finishing Funds Program.

Lawson studied fine arts at Carnegie Mellon University and École Nationale Supèrieure des Beaux-Arts. He received his MFA in Art and Technology Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2003. He is an associate professor of computer visualization in the Department of Art at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.