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LTU wins $40,000 grant for entrepreneurial education

Release Date: January 1, 2014
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Eric Meyer and Mansoor Nasir

Assistant Professor Eric Meyer of Lawrence Technological University (LTU) is the principal investigator for a $40,000 grant to foster the entrepreneurial mindset through the development of multidisciplinary engineering learning modules based in part on the “Quantified Self” social movement.

LTU Assistant Professor Mansoor Nasir, who teaches in the biomedical engineering program with Meyer, is the co-principal investigator. Faculty at Western New England University and Kettering University will collaborate on the research project.

The grant is from the Kern Family Foundation of Waukesha, Wisc. LTU is a member of the Kern Entrepreneur Education Network (KEEN).

The consumer electronics industry is rapidly introducing new sensors and data-logging systems that enable individuals to gain insights into their personal health and wellness through quantification and tracking of a variety of biomedical measures. Social networks such as Facebook and the fitness industry are also embracing the opportunities created by the “Quantified Self” social movement, according to Meyer.

The Kern Foundation grant will support the development of class modules that draw on “Quantified Self” metrics while focusing on the entrepreneurial skills of opportunity, problem definition, and communication. Innovative teaching best practice techniques of Active and Collaborative Learning (ACL) and Problem/Project Based Learning (PBL) will be used to develop multi-disciplinary, multi-level modules that address many of KEEN’s desired outcomes for students. 

“This proposal aims to introduce these exciting trends to students at various academic levels of engineering undergraduate programs,” Meyer said.

Meyer is creating a module for his spring semester course, Biomedical Best Practices, and. Nasir is creating a module for his spring semester course, “Biomedical Device Design, which is related to this topic and entrepreneurial engineering. They will measure the impact on students through quizzes and surveys before and after the modules. During the summer Meyer and Nasir will work with professors at Kettering, and Western New England universities to create additional modules related to this topic that would be introduced in other courses. The courses will be designed for all four undergraduate years and will cover mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, biomedical engineering, and physiology courses. “We will then take the data from the different courses and all the modules that were developed and share that information with KEEN members and at conferences,” Meyer said.