engineering senior projects 2008 - ece

Electrical and Computer Engineering Senior Projects

Computer Temperature Control System
Electronic Bicycle Shifting System
Fully Automated Small-Scale Car Wash
Safe Guard Current Meter
Ultracapacitor Charge/Discharge Circuit


 


Computer Temperature Control System

The Computer Temperature Control System makes use of temperature sensors, a microcontroller, and a computer interface to accurately control the internal temperature of a computer by using fans. By tuning the fans according to the needs of the computer, the amount of power used can be reduced. In a desktop computer, this system reduces the amount of electricity needed to run the computer. When used in a laptop computer, the system reduces the needed electricity and extends the battery’s charge.

Members: Ronald Howe, Robert Lange
Faculty Advisor: Richard Johnston


Top Button




Electronic Bicycle Shifting System

 

The Electronic Bicycle Shifting System (EBSS) is a reliable, automatic bicycle shifting controller that can be used by anyone, regardless of riding experience. The EBSS utilizes a torque sensor mounted on the pedals of a bicycle, along with speed sensors on the rear wheel and pedals. These sensors are used as inputs to a microprocessor which performs calculations and decides the best time to shift to a higher or lower gear. The EBSS differs from other automatic shifting systems by utilizing a torque sensor in addition to speed sensors for control inputs to determine appropriate gear. At this time, most systems use only speed sensors.

Members: Christopher Affer, Scott Wiklund
Faculty Advisor: Ronald Foster


Top Button


 

Fully Automated Small-Scale Car Wash


This project consisted of designing, developing, building, testing, and demonstrating the functionality of a fully automated, small-scale car wash. This car wash incorporates the major functions of a real car wash. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the team’s ability to develop and integrate processes from different fields of engineering, such as electrical, computer, and mechanical. The electrical engineering component of this project consisted of designing and implementing system power and control circuitry. Computer engineering included the selection, acquisition, programming, testing, and integration of the microprocessor. Finally, mechanical engineering design responsibilities included the design and manufacturing of the structure.

This product includes the functions of a real car wash and options that are user selected. In addition to its engineering aspects, the project tested the team’s ability to effectively manage resources, time, and budget.

Members: Nathan Bugosh, Ervin Larashi, Robert Reichel, Ryan Reichel
Faculty Advisor: Richard Johnston


Top Button

 


Safe Guard Current Meter

The U.S. Fire Administration website states that during a typical year, home electrical problems account for 67,800 fires, 485 deaths, and $868 million in property losses. Faulty home electrical wiring causes twice as many fires as electrical appliances. In urban areas, faulty wiring accounts for 33 percent of residential electrical fires. Many avoidable electrical fires can be traced to the misuse of electric cords and overloading circuits. This product warns homeowners when there is a dangerous amount of current going through a wire, and safeguards against faulty fuses and circuit breakers, as well as incorrect fuses or circuit breakers inserted in a load panel. When current rises above the limit of a given wire, an alarm will be triggered. It will inform occupants of the residence or establishment to correct the problem by removing the fuse or switching off the circuit breaker. The Safe Guard Current Meter aims to prevent electrical fires behind walls (fixed wiring) while there are occupants in the area. Placed alongside of a load panel, the meter monitors each 15-amp and 20-amp circuit individually in a residence/establishment and warns occupants of any overloading of a circuit.

Member: Maurice Payne
Faculty Advisor: Richard Johnston


Top Button

 


 

Ultracapacitor Charge/Discharge Circuit

During racing competitions, quick charge and discharge times are essential for success. The team member designed and constructed an external mobile unit for the charging and discharging of the ultracapacitor banks on the 2008 Formula Zero vehicle, a high-performance, fuel cell-powered vehicle, also designed and built by students. This device is required for the 2008 Formula Zero Championship, Student Edition, and ensures the safety of all vehicle personnel.

Member: Andrew Schembri
Faculty Advisor: Robert Farrah

 

  

 Top Button

Electrical and Computer Engineering Senior Projects

Computer Temperature Control System
Electronic Bicycle Shifting System
Fully Automated Small-Scale Car Wash
Safe Guard Current Meter
Ultracapacitor Charge/Discharge Circuit


 


Computer Temperature Control System

The Computer Temperature Control System makes use of temperature sensors, a microcontroller, and a computer interface to accurately control the internal temperature of a computer by using fans. By tuning the fans according to the needs of the computer, the amount of power used can be reduced. In a desktop computer, this system reduces the amount of electricity needed to run the computer. When used in a laptop computer, the system reduces the needed electricity and extends the battery’s charge.

Members: Ronald Howe, Robert Lange
Faculty Advisor: Richard Johnston


Top Button




Electronic Bicycle Shifting System

 

The Electronic Bicycle Shifting System (EBSS) is a reliable, automatic bicycle shifting controller that can be used by anyone, regardless of riding experience. The EBSS utilizes a torque sensor mounted on the pedals of a bicycle, along with speed sensors on the rear wheel and pedals. These sensors are used as inputs to a microprocessor which performs calculations and decides the best time to shift to a higher or lower gear. The EBSS differs from other automatic shifting systems by utilizing a torque sensor in addition to speed sensors for control inputs to determine appropriate gear. At this time, most systems use only speed sensors.

Members: Christopher Affer, Scott Wiklund
Faculty Advisor: Ronald Foster


Top Button


 

Fully Automated Small-Scale Car Wash


This project consisted of designing, developing, building, testing, and demonstrating the functionality of a fully automated, small-scale car wash. This car wash incorporates the major functions of a real car wash. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the team’s ability to develop and integrate processes from different fields of engineering, such as electrical, computer, and mechanical. The electrical engineering component of this project consisted of designing and implementing system power and control circuitry. Computer engineering included the selection, acquisition, programming, testing, and integration of the microprocessor. Finally, mechanical engineering design responsibilities included the design and manufacturing of the structure.

This product includes the functions of a real car wash and options that are user selected. In addition to its engineering aspects, the project tested the team’s ability to effectively manage resources, time, and budget.

Members: Nathan Bugosh, Ervin Larashi, Robert Reichel, Ryan Reichel
Faculty Advisor: Richard Johnston


Top Button

 


Safe Guard Current Meter

The U.S. Fire Administration website states that during a typical year, home electrical problems account for 67,800 fires, 485 deaths, and $868 million in property losses. Faulty home electrical wiring causes twice as many fires as electrical appliances. In urban areas, faulty wiring accounts for 33 percent of residential electrical fires. Many avoidable electrical fires can be traced to the misuse of electric cords and overloading circuits. This product warns homeowners when there is a dangerous amount of current going through a wire, and safeguards against faulty fuses and circuit breakers, as well as incorrect fuses or circuit breakers inserted in a load panel. When current rises above the limit of a given wire, an alarm will be triggered. It will inform occupants of the residence or establishment to correct the problem by removing the fuse or switching off the circuit breaker. The Safe Guard Current Meter aims to prevent electrical fires behind walls (fixed wiring) while there are occupants in the area. Placed alongside of a load panel, the meter monitors each 15-amp and 20-amp circuit individually in a residence/establishment and warns occupants of any overloading of a circuit.

Member: Maurice Payne
Faculty Advisor: Richard Johnston


Top Button

 


 

Ultracapacitor Charge/Discharge Circuit

During racing competitions, quick charge and discharge times are essential for success. The team member designed and constructed an external mobile unit for the charging and discharging of the ultracapacitor banks on the 2008 Formula Zero vehicle, a high-performance, fuel cell-powered vehicle, also designed and built by students. This device is required for the 2008 Formula Zero Championship, Student Edition, and ensures the safety of all vehicle personnel.

Member: Andrew Schembri
Faculty Advisor: Robert Farrah

 

  

 Top Button