elearning

Online, in the classrooms, and behind the camera.

eval and assess

March 20, 2015
by eLearning Staff
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Student evaluation mid term survey data

Now that I have the data, what’s next?

While student evaluation semester survey data is primarily summative for the university, the survey data can serve as formative for the faculty member.  The assumption is that by reflecting on the student feedback faculty teaching will improve, therefore impacting future survey results. Faculty using feedback to evaluate their teaching effectiveness and course content tend to improve.

Using the Lawrence Technological University Student Evaluation Survey questions the faculty member can develop a personal strategic plan.  A plan geared to assess teaching skills for identification of what is working well and opportunities for improvement provides the opportunity to concentrate the application of your talents and abilities. Clear goals can help you to organize your time, access resources to support your goals, and measure success.

You can begin by developing your teaching and course goals for each of the student evaluation survey questions and identify how you support this criteria. For example, how can you identify where in your course you demonstrate “the course is well structured with clear objectives and requirements.”  What evidence do you have for meeting this evaluation criteria? Looking through the students’ eyes how is the information communicated to them, where are they directed to find this information, and how are they expected to use this information? Are the weekly course modules and course assignments designed to support the documented course objectives and requirements? You will want to review each of the student evaluation survey questions and complete this type of documentation for each survey question.

After evaluating your class in the proposed method set some goals and prepare a plan to reach them.  This may include following through with some immediate updates to your course and preparing for more substantial changes for implementation in the next semester. Think about the level you want to reach or maintain and keep working the plan each semester.  With a plan you can reach out to resources provided by the University impacting teaching effectiveness and course content.  University resources include eLearning Services and the Center for Teaching and Learning.

Setting personal performance goals for your role as an instructor with the University can help to maintain control of your destiny. eLearning Services developed the form “Faculty Plan for Course Revision and Teaching Enhancement” to assist with reflection and planning for success in the classroom. Using this form, you will record a plan for improving course content, and enhancing teaching effectiveness. This document can also be used to plan for a visit with an eLearning Services course developer to learn more about tools and strategies to enhance your course.


course dev-02

March 19, 2015
by eLearning Staff
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Getting started with SOTL

Are you interested in finding out more about upcoming Scholarship of Teaching and Learning conferences? There are opportunities for local and virtual presentations as well as available assistance to help you write and present at SOTL conferences.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

eLearning Services encourages faculty members to submit to scholarship of teaching and learning conferences and journals, especially interdisciplinary and collaborative work. SOTL conferences are venues for sharing teaching and learning research and best practices, for peer learning, and for networking. Conference attendance and proceedings may be used for faculty teaching portfolios, a springboard for faculty peer-reviewed publications, as well recruiting for a particular Lawrence Tech University college or program.

Upcoming Conferences

Below are some conferences that were previously attended by LTU faculty members. The conference calls for proposals usually become available approximately 4-7 months prior to the actual conference. At this time, a partial travel expense honorarium is not available; however, it may become available in the future. To save on associated costs, faculty may also consider presenting virtually or attending local conferences.

If you would like to add an upcoming conference, please email the details to elearning@ltu.edu. To be informed of upcoming academic and professional conferences based on your research interests, you may subscribe to this free Web-based service which forwards calls for papers to your Lawrence Tech e-mail address: ConferenceAlerts.

Assistance

If you would like assistance with submitting a proposal to one of these or other SOTL conferences, you may email Marija Franetovic mfranetov@ltu.edu to set up a time for an initial consultation. She is available to guide you in the process of brain-storming teaching and learning topics within your discipline, writing and presenting to a particular venue, and in the overall logistics. As an additional resource, you may refer to the New Media Consortium 2015 Horizon Report for a review of upcoming trends in teaching and learning with new media and technologies.

campus announcements-02

March 19, 2015
by eLearning Staff
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Welcome Sonja!

eLearning is pleased to introduce Sonja Murphy! As many of you know we’ve been without an administrative assistance for some time and we are thrilled Sonja is here to fill this void.

Sonja is an LTU alum. She has a BS in Information Technology and a Masters in Information Systems both from LTU. She is currently pursuing her doctorate at Walden University. Sonja has worked in health care, business and higher education. She also teaches – both online and on-ground so she will be in an excellent position to support our online faculty.  Sonja

Sonja has a son, Brett Michael (age 22) and a daughter Ashlynn (age 10). When she is not working at LTU, she enjoys scrapbooking, baking and going to 80’s rock concerts (she’s seen Bon Jovi over 20 times). She travels and her favorite city is Paris. She will be working on State Authorization, eLearning Course Quality Audits and keep us on track in our goals for growing LTU’s online programs and enrollment. Help us in welcoming her!

dr larry 2-02

March 19, 2015
by eLearning Staff
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Dear Dr. Larry

Dear Dr. Larry is a regular column. Faculty and students can submit questions to Dr. Larry by emailing elearning@ltu.edu. Dr. Larry will answer each month with leading-edge, witty, insightful responses.

Dear Dr. Larry,

Help! eLearning and accrediting agencies are talking about the concept of ALIGNMENT and telling me I need to be sure everything is my course is ALIGNED. The only alignment I worry about is that of my tires! What are they talking about and what does that mean for my courses here at LTU?

Sincerely,

Not GoodYear?

Dear Good Year,

“Alignment” means that all the elements of your course work together to support the objectives and outcomes. In other words, you have a Alignmentreason for including the readings, activities, tools and assessments that you have selected and the reason is that they all directly support the learning outcomes – everything is aligned to that purpose. Consider this example from an LTU Architecture course: The instructor who designed this course has a rational for decisions made regarding the content in the lectures, the images used, the selected readings, the activities and the strategies used to assess the students. All can be linked back to how they support the outcomes! That’s alignment.

You are probably doing this already in your courses and not even aware of it, but it is good practice to reflect on your course and ensure the elements “align.”

As always, you can contact call those nice people over in eLearning for more help. They LOVE this stuff!

Dr. Larry

 

 

media pro-02

February 17, 2015
by eLearning Staff
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Taming the lecture capture beast

When we hear the phrase, “lecture capture,” it is not uncommon to immediately imagine an online course with zero collaborative interaction. This common misconception tends to drive faculty away from utilizing lecture capture technologies. But recording entire lectures, or even parts of them, can actually help students learn more efficiently and increase interaction in the classroom.  While addressing the common concerns, the Panopto Blog illustrates several advantages that accompany the recording of classroom video content.

Lecture capture practices are not limited to the development of online courses. Even though eLearning’s primary focus is LTU’s online presence, many of the same techniques and technologies can be used to enhance on-ground courses. Creating engaging video content for use in online and on-ground classes is just one way to meet criteria for course quality standards.

Click here to learn more about using Panopto to record lectures and supplemental instruction from your computer. Click here to learn more about working with Media Production to create creative course video content.

course dev-02

February 17, 2015
by eLearning Staff
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Research support spotlight: Information literacy assignments or class visits

What is information literacy? Would you like to include more research-based assignments in your courses but are unsure where to start? You can introduce students to research in your discipline and get guidance from our very own librarians. 

The 1st stop – The Library HomePage. When searching, you may either have students cast a wide net via the TechCat+ catalog (1) or start a specific search within their discipline via the appropriate Library Guide (2). To get students started with research, you may direct them to Getting Started with Research.  For further assistance, the Library also offers contact via phone: 248.204.3000, email: refdesk@ltu.edu, or even research assistance with 24/7 Chat Reference, staffed by librarians from all over the country.

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gretchenThe library staff offers many options for faculty, you can request assistance with your research-based assignments or request for a librarian to visit your course. In either case, you may want to speak with an Instructional Research Support Specialist – Gretchen Weiner. Here’s Gretchen’s tag line: “To quote Albert Einstein, ‘If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn’t be called research!’ The library offers access to information in over 110,000 electronic journals, as well as approximately 1,100 print subscriptions covering all disciplines.”

To set up a preliminary meeting send an email to refdesk@ltu.edu with subject heading: “Research Support.” An LTU Librarian will get back with you and help structure assignments with research guidelines, directing your students to the appropriate databases and searches, including appropriate references and citations, discerning copyright, etc. You may also use this opportunity to organize a Research Visit from the Library that would be specific to your course and/or assignment.

eval and assess

February 17, 2015
by eLearning Staff
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Components of “quality feedback”

Providing students with grades and feedback is an integral component of monitoring academic progress.  Students identify instructor feedback as an indication of academic progress and reassurance of skills and knowledge required for future class assignments. What are the components of “quality feedback?”

Feedback provides the student the opportunity to reflect and plan for the next assessment activity. Thoughtful feedback when assessing student learning includes clarification of expectations, identification of areas for improvement with focus on reinforcement of desirable behavior. Negative feedback should be non-judgmental, offer suggestions for improvement, and be specific.  You will want to think about how the feedback will be received and that it is structured to guide the student in learning points, and the student can take action for future assignments.

Data from student evaluation surveys found timely and constructive feedback works best. When you are preparing your course syllabus and assessment of learning communicate a feedback loop. What are the expectations of students, and what can the students expect of the instructor? This is where you want to include the timeline for grading, when to expect the return of graded assignments, and your method of feedback to support students assessment of academic progress.

Blackboard grading tools provide the opportunity to include feedback. This includes (but not limited to) discussion forums, submitted papers, test questions, blogs, rubrics, and journals.  Explore the use of feedback as a key element of formative assessment.

dr larry 2-02

February 17, 2015
by eLearning Staff
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Dear Dr. Larry

Dear Dr. Larry is a regular column. Faculty and students can submit questions to Dr. Larry by emailing elearning@ltu.edu. Dr. Larry will answer each month with leading-edge, witty, insightful responses.

Dear Dr. Larry,

My College is working to be ultra-prepared for accreditation and I’ve been asked to archive examples of student work. I can easily download and save papers and PDF’s, etc. but how do I capture exams that are completed in Blackboard? Long ago, I converted my quizzes and exams so they could be given in Blackboard. This has saved me so much time in grading, but now I’m not sure how to capture the students’ completed exams for accreditation.

Sincerely,

Looking for the Easy Button

Dear Easy Button,

You’re not alone in needing to capture student work. This is a requirement for most accreditation reviews and all of LTU is working on this initiative. You are also right that Blackboard is missing an easy way to capture students’ completed exams. The eLearning and IT people have asked Blackboard to include this feature in future enhancements, but until they waive the magic wand and give us that “easy button,” we do have a work-around. It may look cumbersome, it really isn’t.

eHelp web page directions: https://www.ltu.edu/ehelp/print_bb_test_details.asp

I strongly encourage you to have discussions with your departments about what actually needs to be archived. Most accreditation bodies want to see examples of exemplary work (aka high pass), satisfactory work (aka low pass), and inferior work (aka fail). That may mean you do NOT have to archive ALL student work, but rather only a few examples of each level. That will make your task much easier.

As always, you can contact call those nice people over in eLearning for more help

Dr. Larry

elearning-support

January 16, 2015
by eLearning Staff
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Faculty feature – Prof. Sky: Flipped lectures and low stake quizzes

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Professor Tony Sky is always looking for new ways to engage his students. This year he is using Panopto to record mini lectures prior to class. He has coupled them with low stakes quizzes that students complete before class. Through this method, students hit the ground running with questions and perhaps curiosity about new material.

The mini lectures are only 10-15 long, enough to get students prepared for the next session. The online quizzes are also around 10-15 points, which ultimately becomes a small portion of their grade yet it is still a motivator. Students are given 3 tries to complete the quizzes, because as Prof. Sky would say – “it’s all about learning, isn’t it?”

Prof. Sky completed a MOOC course in 2013 in which he saw this method was effective for him. He wanted to try it with his course, so he stopped by eLearning and inquired into some best practices.

It’s week 1. Students have seen their first flipped lecture and taken their first online quiz. Of course there were some minor glitches but all-in-all it went well. Prof. Sky is ready to do it next week. One of the questions was eliminated and partial credit was given to other questions, then scores were recalculated.

What’s in store for week 2 you ask? We are doing another flipped lecture and figuring out how to best create matching questions with either/or choices. We’re also using the SnipIt Tool to bring in some of the molecule pictures into the questions themselves. Finally, and probably best of all, we’re figuring out what we can collaboratively work on in class, now that we’ve freed up some time.

a chem news 3

Prof. Sky says: “This method frees up the time so we can talk about questions, work on problems in class…dig a little deeper…essentially; learn together. I hope students are getting more out of it. Instead of racing to cover the lecture notes we are actually thinking through the problems together.”

For more information on flipped classroom, please see: https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7081.pdf

For more information about using Panopto, please see: http://www.ltu.edu/ehelp/panopto_instructor_info.asp

For more information on test creation in Blackboard, please see: http://www.ltu.edu/ehelp/create_tests.asp

And, of course, if you have an idea, and want to see if it will work in your classroom, stop by eLearning Services.

course dev-02

January 15, 2015
by eLearning Staff
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Web Accessibility (Part II): Providing text alternatives, captions for course video recordings

Web accessibility allows for students with disabilities to perceive, understand, navigate, interact, and contribute to their courses which have online components. The first article published in the November 2014 issue summarized strategies for addressing accessibility of course documents and Blackboard. This article (Part II) summarizes strategies for using audio and video course material to create a transcript.

Popular media technologies for delivering recorded videos vary in the ability to create transcripts. The Blackboard Panopto recording software currently does not provide the ability to produce a video transcript. YouTube does provide the ability to create transcripts for which the author can edit and import a video recording produced by another media technology to produce a transcript. Providing a transcript for course video material makes your recorded lectures and course material more searchable and accessible. YouTube can generate the transcript and captions automatically.

It is not perfect, and accuracy is dependent on several factors including audio quality, pauses in dialog, long runtime, and more. While this process is not 100% accurate it does help in the first steps of translating the video dialogue to text . The generated file can then be edited to develop a file that matches the video dialogue 100% and to add punctuation. YouTube transcript options also include the ability to upload a transcript file previously generated.

Convert Panopto to YouTube:

Converting the Panopto video to a YouTube format provides the option to create a transcript and add captions to the video. Once you have the caption file you can edit the content to match the dialogue. Like said before this process is not 100% accurate, but it does help in the first steps of translating the dialogue to text for editing.


The first step is to download the recorded Panopto file into a format compatible with YouTube.

Panopto.com provides a tutorial “How to Upload a Panopto Video to YouTube”

Once your video is loaded to YouTube you can now create a transcript.  Review the tutorial “How to Add Captions to YouTube Videos by Creating Transcripts